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City Releases Regional Transportation Referendum Draft Project List

If the July 31 referendum passes, the city is expected to receive a little over $9 million per year for 10 years, or about $94 million total to spend on local projects.

by Patch Staff

 City officials hosted a regional transportation referendum at City Hall Tuesday night to highlight the expected $94 million in road project funding Atlanta stands to gain if voters approve the July 31 referendum.

If passed, the city projects receipts of a little more than $ 9 million per year for 10 years.

The city's transportation projects list is broken into four categories:

  • Projects selected for funding by the Atlanta Region Transportation Investment Act Roundtable that are part of the Final Investment List, the roundtable approved on October 13, 2011. These projects are not subject to change.
  • High-priority projects recommended for funding by city staff for fiscal years 2013-2018. These projects were pulled directly from adopted transportation plans, with a special focus on multimodal corridor improvements along major city-maintained roadways and within economic development priority areas.
  • Livable Centers Initiative projects recommended for funding by city staff for fiscal years 2013-2018. These projects were pulled directly from adopted Livable Centers Initiative studies, with a special focus on LCI areas that have had a limited number of projects funded in the past.
  • Neighborhood projects recommended for funding by city staff for fiscal years 2013-2018. These projects were pulled directly from adopted transportation plans and selected through a comprehensive public involvement process, which included consultation with City Councilmembers. The city staffers recommend roughly 35 percent of estimated revenue — $16 million over five years — be directed toward these neighborhood projects.

Officials said they will concentrate on making improvements to some of the city’s busiest roads and intersections. In addition, making heavily congested areas more pedestrian friendly and making parks more bike-friendly would also focused goals.

Over the last several months, the Mayor’s Office, Department of Planning & Community Development and Department of Public Works, in coordination with Atlanta residents and the Atlanta City Council, developed a Draft Local Investment Framework to guide the expenditure of the 15 percent local discretionary revenue over the first five years of the ten-year period. 

The city invites residents to review the Draft Local Investment Framework and submit comments by e-mail at tiacomments@atlantaga.gov or by phone at 404.330.6145 until June 19, 2012 at 5 p.m.

 

Citywide there are a total of 108 Transportation Projects including:

– 36 Final Investment List Projects (2013‐2022)

– 10 High‐priority Projects (2013‐2018)

– 10 Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) Projects (2013‐2018)

– 52 Neighborhood Projects (2013‐2018)

With these projects, it is expected that 92.9 percent of city population lives within a half-mile of one or more of them.

Here is a breakdown of the projects that impact the communities of East Atlanta Patch:

Regional Transportation Referendum- Draft Local Investment Framework

Project #

Project Name and Description

AT-007

Atlanta Beltline & Atlanta Streetcar Transit & Trail - Downtown and Midtown to Southwest: Will improve rail transit access to multiple regional employment/activity centers, including Downtown by extending the TIGER II-funded streetcar to the southwest Atlanta BeltLine corridor. Also includes upgrades to the TIGER II-funded streetcar light maintenance facility at Edgewood Avenue and I-75/85. Total project cost: $435.9 million to be entirely funded under TIA.

AT-001(59)

North Ave from US 41 (Northside Dr) to US 23 (Moreland Ave) - Traffic Improvements: Will provide traffic improvements along North Avenue from Northside Drive to Moreland Avenue. Improvements will include traffic signal coordination, modernization and optimization and associated traffic studies, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, milling and resurfacing, pavement markings, signage and street lights, as appropriate. Total project cost: $457,500 to be entirely funded under TIA.

AT-001(50)

Boulevard from Ponce de Leon Ave (US 78/US 278/SR 8) to McDonough Blvd (SR 42 Spur) - Traffic Improvements: Will provide traffic improvements along Boulevard from US 78 (Ponce de Leon Avenue) to SR 42 Spur (McDonough Boulevard). Improvements will include traffic signal coordination, modernization and optimization and associated traffic studies, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, milling and resurfacing, pavement markings, signage and street lights, as appropriate. Total project cost: $1.15 million to be funded under TIA.

N-2.1

Boulevard from Ponce de Leon Ave (US 78/US 278/SR 8) to DeKalb Ave – Pedestrian Safety Improvements: Will install raised median islands along Boulevard between North Avenue and John Wesley Dobbs Avenue and construct mid-block crosswalks with appropriate countermeasures and make pedestrian safety improvements at signalized intersections between Ponce de Leon Avenue (US 78/US 278/SR 8) and Memorial Drive (SR 154). Exact locations of the improvements will be identified through a Roadway Safety Audit, which will include an analysis of pedestrian crash data, consultation with MARTA staff and interviews with community members and law enforcement officers. Neighborhood Project allocation may be used to leverage additional federal funding through the ARC Last-mile Connectivity Program.

N-5.4

DeKalb Ave from Arizona Ave to DeKalb Pl/Rocky Ford Rd – Multi-use Path

HP-7

DeKalb Ave from Hurt St to City Limits - Complete Street: milling and repaving, sidewalk and ADA ramp repair and installation, reversible lane removal and addition of bicycle facilities along DeKalb Ave between MARTA Inman Park-Reynoldstown Station (Hurt St) and city limits, including bicycle and pedestrian improvements at DeKalb Ave at Oakdale Rd/Whitefoord Ave and DeKalb Ave at DeKalb Pl/Rocky Ford Rd and pedestrian safety improvements in the vicinity of MARTA Edgewood-Candler Park and East Lake stations.

AT-001(53)

Edgewood Ave from Peachtree St to Elizabeth St - Traffic Improvements: Will provide traffic improvements along Edgewood Avenue from Peachtree Street to Elizabeth Street. Improvements will include traffic signal coordination, modernization, and optimization and associated traffic studies, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, milling and resurfacing, pavement markings, signage and street lights, as appropriate. Total project cost: $527,667 to be entirely funded under TIA.

N-2.2

Highland Ave from Glen Iris Dr to Sampson St – New Street Lighting

AT-001(58)

Monroe Dr from Piedmont Cir to Ponce de Leon Ave (US 78/278/SR 8) - Traffic Improvements: Will provide traffic improvements along Monroe Drive from Piedmont Circle to Ponce de Leon Avenue. Improvements will include traffic signal coordination, modernization, and optimization and associated traffic studies, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, milling and resurfacing, pavement markings, signage and street lights, as appropriate. Total project cost: $706,250 to be entirely funded under TIA.

N-6.3 Monroe Dr at 8th St to Ponce de Leon Ave at Ponce City Market (US 78/US 278/SR 8) – New Street Connection LCI-7 Moreland Ave (US 23/SR 42) Pedestrian Improvements and Lane Conversion: streetscape and pedestrian improvements along Moreland Ave (US 23/SR 42) between Mansfield St and DeKalb Ave, including installation of mid-block crossing between Mansfield Ave and Euclid Ave and lane conversion between Euclid Ave and DeKalb Ave to add bicycle facilities, median and/or on-street parking. N-2.4 North Ave from Freedom Pkwy (SR 10) to N Highland Ave – Pedestrian Safety Improvements N-5.5 Park Pl (US 278/SR 10) from College Ave to East Lake Dr – Pedestrian Safety Improvements AT-001(64) Ponce de Leon Ave (US 78/US 278/SR 8) from Spring St to Clifton Rd - Traffic Improvements: Will provide traffic improvements along Ponce de Leon Avenue from Spring Street to Clifton Road. Improvements will include traffic signal coordination, modernization, and optimization and associated traffic studies, Americans with Disabilities Act improvements, milling and resurfacing, pavement markings, signage and street lights, as appropriate. Total project cost: $618,125 to be entirely funded under TIA.
Péralte Paul June 08, 2012 at 12:30 PM
What do you think of the projects in the Patch neighborhoods? Is there enough representation?
johnk June 08, 2012 at 07:57 PM
Good: Traffic light syncing on Ponce and on North Ave. Not sure: mid-block pedestrian crossing at the Vortex on Moreland? You can already cross at L5P light and at Mansfield, do we really need this crossing? Not sure: lane conversion on Moreland from L5P to Dekalb Ave... are we losing a car lane? I'd like an explanation of the plan here. Heavy traffic area, let's make sure we get it right. I generally favor improvements for pedestrians and cyclists, let's just be careful not to create auto gridlock.
Joe_Harris June 08, 2012 at 09:05 PM
The Atlanta Beltline Projects definitely interest me. It will definitely make it easier for residents who live inside the city to get around the city with more ease. I think there is enough representation proposed in these projects. I will be voting yes for the Regional Transportation Referendum so that these projects can come to pass.
RS MUSE June 09, 2012 at 11:08 PM
MARTA bailout disguised as the Atlanta Regional Transportation Referendum for a new 1% SALES TAX. The referendum is being touted by several special interest groups, like MAVEN, and the City of Atlanta as a solution to Atlanta’s traffic problems. Supposedly the new sales tax would only last 10 years and then expire. It is critical that everyone understand what they are really voting for or against. It is clear from examining MARTA’s 2010 and 2011 “Annual Report” that MARTA is broke and going under. The situation is so bad that they do not even include any financial statements, like a Balance Sheet or Cash Flow Statement in their Annual Reports.MARTA already gets 60% of its revenue from sales taxes, not from ridership. Now they need to make up the rest of their $300M per year shortfall on the backs of the neighboring counties. So, an $8.5B pile of pork with half the revenue for failing MARTA. It has pork for votes for the outlying counties. This is another obvious bailout and redistribution of personal income. So, it is up to each of us to decide on July 31 if we will join the City of Atlanta, Fulton, and DeKalb counties in funding MARTA in perpetuity, because MARTA will never be self-sustaining. Atlanta must become another New York, which is what Atlanta elected officials desire.

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